A massive seawall for Southeast Texas could save money. But so far, there's none to spend

If the Houston-Galveston region continues to boom for the next 60 years and sea level rises as scientists predict, a direct hit to Galveston from a massive hurricane could destroy an estimated $31.8 billion worth of homes, a new study says.

But Texas A&M researchers found that if the government builds a 17-foot barrier about 60 miles long from Galveston Island to Bolivar Peninsula, the potential residential destruction from a storm surge would drop to about $6 billion – a reduction of more than 80 percent.

The only problem: So far, Texas can't get congressional funding to build the coastal barrier, a proposal that has been floated since Hurricane Ike threatened to make a run for Galveston in 2008.

"The numbers make sense," said state Sen. Larry Taylor, a Friendswood Republican who has tried for years to get federal funding for a coastal barrier, estimated to cost up to $12 billion. "This investment is going to pay for itself time and time again."

After Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast in August, Taylor and other supporters of the coastal barrier saw their opportunity. Both City of Houston and state officials asked the federal government to include $12 billion for a barrier as part of their post-Harvey aid requests.

 

Continue reading this article posted on the Houston Chronicle here.