Smart Cities Technologies Give Back 125 Hours to Citizens Every Year

The record for the world’s worst traffic jam belongs to Beijing’s gridlock. For 12 days in August 2010, cars could not escape 62 miles of freeway. This example, alongside the U.N.’s prediction that by 2030 two-thirds of the world’s population will reside in densely packed megacities, reinforces a real urgency to alleviate the pressures and impact of overcrowding.

The concept of “smart cities,” which employs Internet of Things (IoT) technologies such as connected sensors, meters and lights to collect and analyze data to improve public infrastructure and services, holds the promise to dramatically change the way citizens live, work and get around. But is there a way to tangibly measure these benefits?

Continue reading this article...

 

You might also like...